los chairos nos siguen https://prensa-fifi.com somos conservadores fifi, sabelotodo, hipócritas y doble cara; para los mexicanos somos su voz y decimos lo que no quieren oír a vivir que este mundo es de los locos. Los conformistas se quedas en el pasado Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:28 +0000 es hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://i2.wp.com/prensa-fifi.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/cropped-LOGO-2-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 los chairos nos siguen https://prensa-fifi.com 32 32 163812922 A new reboot of the iconic Eastern Air Lines is flying between New York and Cabo this winter for under $250 round-trip https://prensa-fifi.com/a-new-reboot-of-the-iconic-eastern-air-lines-is-flying-between-new-york-and-cabo-this-winter-for-under-250-round-trip/ https://prensa-fifi.com/a-new-reboot-of-the-iconic-eastern-air-lines-is-flying-between-new-york-and-cabo-this-winter-for-under-250-round-trip/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:28 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/a-new-reboot-of-the-iconic-eastern-air-lines-is-flying-between-new-york-and-cabo-this-winter-for-under-250-round-trip/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.businessinsider.com


An Eastern Airlines Boeing 767-300ER.
Eastern Airlines
  • Eastern Airlines is launching non-stop flights between New York and Los Cabos, Mexico, starting November 14.
  • No, not that Eastern Airlines.
  • The new airline is a product of 2020 that's attempting a reboot of the iconic Eastern Air Lines that ceased operations in 1991.
  • Flights to South America began in January and expanded to the Caribbean over the summer but the new airline is nothing like the old.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico will only be a non-stop flight away from New York City this fall as a new airline prepares to inaugurate a new route between the two cities on November 14.

Eastern Airlines will operate the twice-weekly flights to the Mexican vacation destination, departing from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport and currently selling for unusually low introductory fares of under $250 round-trip. But while many will recognize the airline's name, hardly any will recognize the airline itself.

No, it's not the Eastern Air Lines of the 20th century, though this airline is trading on its name and brand. Eastern Air Lines (with a space between air and line) was a major US carrier that ceased operations in 1991 and has been the focus of two relaunch attempts in the past decade alone.

January saw its first flight of the reincarnated airline between New York and Guayaquil, Ecuador, operating the first scheduled passenger flight under the Eastern name in nearly 30 years, but with a completely different look and feel.

A dynamic history

Aviation said goodbye to the original Eastern Air Lines in the early 1990s after a 65-year run that started in 1926 as Pitcairn Aviation. A leader in the domestic market, the magnitude of its loss to US aviation was comparable to that of Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines.

The second iteration of Eastern Airlines took flight in 2015 with Boeing 737 aircraft used exclusively for charter operations, according to AirlineGeeks. Planes were painted in the iconic blue and white livery complete with Eastern's original logo but it was largely a novelty as the average flyer couldn't book a flight on the new airline.

Charter aircraft of that size are typically reserved to transport large groups including sports teams, military troops, and even presidential campaigns. The limited nature of its return to the skies meant the public was largely unaware of Eastern's comeback until it was bolstered into the spotlight in October 2016.

The airline was involved in a high-profile incident when one of its planes flying for the Trump campaign and carrying then-Governor and Vice Presidential Candidate Mike Pence overran the runway while landing at New York's LaGuardia Airport. No injuries were reported, according to PBS, but the incident occurred just days before the 2016 election that made Pence vice president.

It wasn't Trump's first run-in with Eastern, as he had bought the Eastern Air Lines Shuttle 26 years prior and turned it into the Trump Shuttle flying between New York, Washington, and Boston. But like the Trump Shuttle, the second coming on Eastern was short-lived, ceasing operations in 2017.

The storied history notwithstanding, the new Eastern Airlines also isn't exactly a new airline. It's the end result of a rebranding effort by Dynamic Airways, a similarly obscure airline that operated similar flights from New York and Florida to the Caribbean and South America.

Unlike the charter airline, this version of Eastern kept the name but introduced a new branding style and livery for its aircraft. The only identifiable remnants of the old airline on the newly-repainted aircraft is a small former Eastern Air Lines logo on their tails.

New flights from New York

Eastern's relaunch centers around a New York and Miami-based route network with an all-international flying schedule. Its first flight departed in January from John F. Kennedy International Airport bound for Guayaquil, Ecuador – a popular route also served by JetBlue Airways and LATAM Airlines – with a second route to Georgetown, Guyana from New York starting in March and third to Port-au-Prince, Haiti in August.

The new route to Los Cabos will be the airline's fourth from New York and sixth overall as Eastern also operates two routes to South America from Miami. Its only competitor on the New York-Los Cabo route will be United Airlines, which flies from nearby Newark, New Jersey also non-stop to the Baja California Sur vacation destination.

Eastern's flights will be operated using Boeing 767-300ER aircraft offering two cabin classes of service, economy and premium. Economy seats are configured in a standard 2-3-2 configuration while the premium cabin will see recliner seats in a 2-2-2 configuration.

The twice-weekly service will depart on Wednesdays and Saturdays from JFK Airport's Terminal 4 at 9:20 a.m. and arrive at Los Cabos International Airport at 1:30 p.m., according to Cirium route data. The return flight departs the same days at 3:30 p.m., arriving back in New York at 11:40 p.m.

Flights on most Eastern routes aren't daily and passengers expecting the Eastern Air Lines of yesteryear will be disappointed. A January inaugural flight review by The Points Guy found that the experience left a lot to be desired, even in the premium cabin.

But the airline does allow free checked bags and only charges $10 for regular seat assignments and $25 for exit row or extra legroom seats. Combined with the low introductory fares on the new route to Mexico, flyers not caring about extras like in-flight entertainment can safe on airfare.

Visit South America, on Eastern Airlines

Eastern has plans to expand further into South America to destinations further below the equator than Guayaquil. Recent filings with the Department of Transportation request authority for the airline to fly to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Santa Cruz, Bolivia, from Miami.

Bolivia flights would start in November while Buenos Aires flights would begin in December if approved.


An Eastern Airlines Boeing 767-300ER. Eastern Airlines Eastern Airlines is launching non-stop flights between New York and Los Cabos, Mexico, starting November 14.

No, not that Eastern Airlines.

The new airline is a product of 2020 that’s attempting a reboot of the iconic Eastern Air Lines that ceased operations in 1991.

Flights to South America began in January and expanded to the Caribbean over the summer but the new airline is nothing like the old.

Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories .

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico will only be a non-stop flight away from New York City this fall as a new airline prepares to inaugurate a new route between the two cities on November 14.

Eastern Airlines will operate the twice-weekly flights to the Mexican vacation destination, departing from New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport and currently selling for unusually low introductory fares of under $250 round-trip. But while many will recognize the airline’s name, hardly any will recognize the airline itself.

No, it’s not the Eastern Air Lines of the 20th century, though this airline is trading on its name and brand. Eastern Air Lines (with a space between air and line) was a major US carrier that ceased operations in 1991 and has been the focus of two relaunch attempts in the past decade alone.

January saw its first flight of the reincarnated airline between New York and Guayaquil, Ecuador, operating the first scheduled passenger flight under the Eastern name in nearly 30 years, but with a completely different look and feel. A dynamic history

Aviation said goodbye to the original Eastern Air Lines in the early 1990s after a 65-year run that started in 1926 as Pitcairn Aviation. A leader in the domestic market, the magnitude of its loss to US aviation was comparable to that of Pan American World Airways and Trans World Airlines.

The second iteration of Eastern Airlines took flight in 2015 with Boeing 737 aircraft used exclusively for charter operations, according to AirlineGeeks . Planes were painted in the iconic blue and white livery complete with Eastern’s original logo but it was largely a novelty as the average flyer couldn’t book a flight on the new airline.

Charter aircraft of that size are typically reserved to transport large groups including sports teams, military troops, and even presidential campaigns. The limited nature of its return to the skies meant the public was largely unaware of Eastern’s comeback until it was bolstered into the spotlight in October 2016.

The airline was involved in a high-profile incident when one of its planes flying for the Trump campaign and carrying then-Governor and Vice Presidential Candidate Mike Pence overran the runway while landing at New York’s LaGuardia Airport. No injuries were reported, according to PBS , but the incident occurred just days before the 2016 election that made Pence vice president.

It wasn’t Trump’s first run-in with Eastern, as he had bought the Eastern Air Lines Shuttle 26 years prior and turned it into the Trump Shuttle flying between New York, Washington, and Boston . But like the Trump Shuttle, the second coming on Eastern was short-lived, ceasing operations in 2017.

The storied history notwithstanding, the new Eastern Airlines also isn’t exactly a new airline. It’s the end result of a rebranding effort by Dynamic Airways, a similarly obscure airline that operated similar flights from New York and Florida to the Caribbean and South America.

Unlike the charter airline, this version of Eastern kept the name but introduced a new branding style and livery for its aircraft. The only identifiable remnants of the old airline on the newly-repainted aircraft is a small former Eastern Air Lines logo on their tails. New flights from New York

Eastern’s relaunch centers around a New York and Miami-based route network with an all-international flying schedule. Its first flight departed in January from John F. Kennedy International Airport bound for Guayaquil, Ecuador – a popular route also served by JetBlue Airways and LATAM Airlines – with a second route to Georgetown, Guyana from New York starting in March and third to Port-au-Prince, Haiti in August.

The new route to Los Cabos will be the airline’s fourth from New York and sixth overall as Eastern also operates two routes to South America from Miami. Its only competitor on the New York-Los Cabo route will be United Airlines, which flies from nearby Newark, New Jersey also non-stop to the Baja California Sur vacation destination.

Eastern’s flights will be operated using Boeing 767-300ER aircraft offering two cabin classes of service, economy and premium. Economy seats are configured in a standard 2-3-2 configuration while the premium cabin will see recliner seats in a 2-2-2 configuration.

The twice-weekly service will depart on Wednesdays and Saturdays from JFK Airport’s Terminal 4 at 9:20 a.m. and arrive at Los Cabos International Airport at 1:30 p.m., according to Cirium route data. The return flight departs the same days at 3:30 p.m., arriving back in New York at 11:40 p.m.

Flights on most Eastern routes aren’t daily and passengers expecting the Eastern Air Lines of yesteryear will be disappointed. A January inaugural flight review by The Points Guy found that the experience left a lot to be desired, even in the premium cabin.

But the airline does allow free checked bags and only charges $10 for regular seat assignments and $25 for exit row or extra legroom seats. Combined with the low introductory fares on the new route to Mexico, flyers not caring about extras like in-flight entertainment can safe on airfare. Visit South America, on Eastern Airlines

Eastern has plans to expand further into South America to destinations further below the equator than Guayaquil. Recent filings with the Department of Transportation request authority for the airline to fly to Buenos Aires, Argentina , and Santa Cruz, Bolivia , from Miami.

Bolivia flights would start in November while Buenos Aires flights would begin in December if approved.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/a-new-reboot-of-the-iconic-eastern-air-lines-is-flying-between-new-york-and-cabo-this-winter-for-under-250-round-trip/feed/ 0 25395
Mexico will pay for any COVID-19 vaccine liabilities, government says https://prensa-fifi.com/mexico-will-pay-for-any-covid-19-vaccine-liabilities-government-says/ https://prensa-fifi.com/mexico-will-pay-for-any-covid-19-vaccine-liabilities-government-says/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:26 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/mexico-will-pay-for-any-covid-19-vaccine-liabilities-government-says/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at news.yahoo.com


Mexico will pay for any COVID-19 vaccine liabilities, government says
FILE PHOTO: Small bottles labeled with "Vaccine" stickers stand near a medical syringe in front of displayed "Coronavirus COVID-19" words in this illustration

By Anthony Esposito and Adriana Barrera

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico's government will pay to cover any liabilities arising from unexpected side effects of COVID-19 vaccines but is not considering creating a fund to do so, a top official said.

As various vaccine candidates make their way through different stages of clinical trials, it is unclear who foots the bill if people in poor countries fall sick from treatments.

"If that contingency arises, these funds can be obtained from the treasury," Martha Delgado, the deputy foreign minister in charge of Mexico's international response to the pandemic, told Reuters in an interview.

"There are levels of risk and we have to assume them," she added, noting that no special fund was planned.

Under the World Health Organization's (WHO) COVID-19 vaccine plans, known as COVAX, 92 poor countries are eligible to access vaccines at lower or no cost until the end of 2021.

Mexico believes potential side effects will likely be caught during the vaccine trials and by health authorities.

"I don't believe the WHO and its entire network of associations ... would launch (a vaccine) and make available to over 100 countries something that is questionable from the point of view of safety or responsibility," said Delgado.

According to confidential documents reviewed by Reuters and six people familiar with the matter, the WHO has left the issue of financial claims unresolved, as it seeks to ensure that the injections are distributed fairly.

Not participating in COVAX agreements was riskier for Mexico, she said: "How much does that risk cost?" she asked.

The terms for joining COVAX are the same for all signatories, but "if you don't have that agreement, you don't have COVAX, full stop," Delgado said.

The government wants to vaccinate nearly all of Mexico's population against coronavirus by the end of 2021 after reaching deals with pharmaceutical companies Pfizer, AstraZeneca and CanSino, plus with COVAX.

Delgado expects the first vaccine doses to come from the pharmaceutical firms that have promised the earliest deliveries. COVAX has not committed to a date, while Pfizer has offered to start delivering as early as December, she noted.


FILE PHOTO: Small bottles labeled with «Vaccine» stickers stand near a medical syringe in front of displayed «Coronavirus COVID-19» words in this illustration By Anthony Esposito and Adriana Barrera

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico’s government will pay to cover any liabilities arising from unexpected side effects of COVID-19 vaccines but is not considering creating a fund to do so, a top official said.

As various vaccine candidates make their way through different stages of clinical trials, it is unclear who foots the bill if people in poor countries fall sick from treatments.

«If that contingency arises, these funds can be obtained from the treasury,» Martha Delgado, the deputy foreign minister in charge of Mexico’s international response to the pandemic, told Reuters in an interview.

«There are levels of risk and we have to assume them,» she added, noting that no special fund was planned.

Under the World Health Organization’s (WHO) COVID-19 vaccine plans, known as COVAX, 92 poor countries are eligible to access vaccines at lower or no cost until the end of 2021.

Mexico believes potential side effects will likely be caught during the vaccine trials and by health authorities.

«I don’t believe the WHO and its entire network of associations … would launch (a vaccine) and make available to over 100 countries something that is questionable from the point of view of safety or responsibility,» said Delgado.

According to confidential documents reviewed by Reuters and six people familiar with the matter, the WHO has left the issue of financial claims unresolved, as it seeks to ensure that the injections are distributed fairly.

Not participating in COVAX agreements was riskier for Mexico, she said: «How much does that risk cost?» she asked.

The terms for joining COVAX are the same for all signatories, but «if you don’t have that agreement, you don’t have COVAX, full stop,» Delgado said.

The government wants to vaccinate nearly all of Mexico’s population against coronavirus by the end of 2021 after reaching deals with pharmaceutical companies Pfizer, AstraZeneca and CanSino, plus with COVAX.

Delgado expects the first vaccine doses to come from the pharmaceutical firms that have promised the earliest deliveries. COVAX has not committed to a date, while Pfizer has offered to start delivering as early as December, she noted.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/mexico-will-pay-for-any-covid-19-vaccine-liabilities-government-says/feed/ 0 25396
Mexico’s Consumer Protection Office Resolves First Cases in Dairy Product Dispute https://prensa-fifi.com/mexicos-consumer-protection-office-resolves-first-cases-in-dairy-product-dispute-2/ https://prensa-fifi.com/mexicos-consumer-protection-office-resolves-first-cases-in-dairy-product-dispute-2/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:23 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/mexicos-consumer-protection-office-resolves-first-cases-in-dairy-product-dispute/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.perishablenews.com


MEXICO CITY – Mexico’s government has begun resolving a string of disputes with major food suppliers over dairy products pulled from market shelves this week for breaches of standards, and aims to settle pending issues quickly, a senior official said on Thursday.

Mexico late on Tuesday halted the sale of over 20 dairy goods, including cheese products from U.S.-based Mondelez International Inc and Mexican firms Grupo Lala and Sigma, plus yogurt from France’s Danone.

Ricardo Sheffield, head of Mexico’s consumer protection office PROFECO, said he had reached agreements with Lala and Sigma over issues involving their products.

To read the rest of the story, please go to: Reuters


MEXICO CITY – Mexico’s government has begun resolving a string of disputes with major food suppliers over dairy products pulled from market shelves this week for breaches of standards, and aims to settle pending issues quickly, a senior official said on Thursday.

Mexico late on Tuesday halted the sale of over 20 dairy goods, including cheese products from U.S.-based Mondelez International Inc and Mexican firms Grupo Lala and Sigma, plus yogurt from France’s Danone.

Ricardo Sheffield, head of Mexico’s consumer protection office PROFECO, said he had reached agreements with Lala and Sigma over issues involving their products.

To read the rest of the story, please go to: Reuters

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/mexicos-consumer-protection-office-resolves-first-cases-in-dairy-product-dispute-2/feed/ 0 25397
Putting the ‘X’ back in Mexico: Gigantic red sculpture getting a makeover in Juarez https://prensa-fifi.com/putting-the-x-back-in-mexico-gigantic-red-sculpture-getting-a-makeover-in-juarez-2/ https://prensa-fifi.com/putting-the-x-back-in-mexico-gigantic-red-sculpture-getting-a-makeover-in-juarez-2/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:21 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/putting-the-x-back-in-mexico-gigantic-red-sculpture-getting-a-makeover-in-juarez/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.valleycentral.com


JUAREZ, Mexico (Border Report) – The desert sun and wind haven’t been kind to one of Juarez’s most distinctive man-made features. The paint has dulled and is beginning to fade on the gigantic red “X” just south of the Bridge of the Americas.

That’s why the city and private donors are investing half a million dollars in renovations that include sealing cracks and applying four new coats of paint to “La Equis” on the Juarez Fairgrounds. Work began last week with repairs and the application of white primer. It will last at least three months, Juarez officials said.

White primer has been applied to “La Equis,” Juarez’s iconic 202-foot-tall sculpture just south of the Bridge of the Americas that connects the city to El Paso, Texas. Four new coats of red paint will be applied to the giant “X” in weeks to come. (photo courtesy City of Juarez)

“The ‘X’ has become an icon, a symbol that represents Juarez to the rest of the world. We want to restore its shine, its beauty,” said former Mexican consul Juan Acereto, who’s now Mayor Armando Cabada’s representative in El Paso.

Anyone who drives on Interstate 10 in Central El Paso can clearly see the 62-meter tall (202 feet) structure across the border. The sculpture inaugurated in 2013 stands as the backdrop of concerts held at the fair’s amphitheater in Juarez.

The meaning of the “X” has always puzzled visitors. Acereto said it has several meanings, all related to the Mexican identity.

“It is the ‘x’ in Mexico, it is the crossing of Spanish and Indian blood, it stands on the Chamizal, a national symbol because it’s land Mexico recovered from the United States,” he said. The two circles at the “waist” of the X represent the jaguar claws at the center of the Aztec Calendar Stone, another Mexican icon.

Chihuahua state sculptor Sebastian designed the monument and, prior to its inauguration, told Mexican media that the letter X has a special meaning for Juarez. That’s because the city’s namesake, former Mexican President Benito Juarez, officially changed “Mejico” to “Mexico” in 1857. The name stems from the native American Nahuatl language but the Spaniards who conquered Mexico always used a “J,” he said.

“It’s about recovering our symbols, our identity. Now we include the ‘X’ whenever we do presentations or put out videos about the city of Juarez,” Acereto said.

He added that, at the urging of Sebastian, the mayor began setting aside funds and encouraging prominent individuals to contribute to the repairs.

Visit the BorderReport.com homepage for the latest exclusive stories and breaking news about issues along the United States-Mexico border.


JUAREZ, Mexico (Border Report) – The desert sun and wind haven’t been kind to one of Juarez’s most distinctive man-made features. The paint has dulled and is beginning to fade on the gigantic red “X” just south of the Bridge of the Americas.

That’s why the city and private donors are investing half a million dollars in renovations that include sealing cracks and applying four new coats of paint to “La Equis” on the Juarez Fairgrounds. Work began last week with repairs and the application of white primer. It will last at least three months, Juarez officials said. White primer has been applied to “La Equis,” Juarez’s iconic 202-foot-tall sculpture just south of the Bridge of the Americas that connects the city to El Paso, Texas. Four new coats of red paint will be applied to the giant “X” in weeks to come. (photo courtesy City of Juarez) “The ‘X’ has become an icon, a symbol that represents Juarez to the rest of the world. We want to restore its shine, its beauty,” said former Mexican consul Juan Acereto, who’s now Mayor Armando Cabada’s representative in El Paso.

Anyone who drives on Interstate 10 in Central El Paso can clearly see the 62-meter tall (202 feet) structure across the border. The sculpture inaugurated in 2013 stands as the backdrop of concerts held at the fair’s amphitheater in Juarez.

The meaning of the “X” has always puzzled visitors. Acereto said it has several meanings, all related to the Mexican identity.

“It is the ‘x’ in Mexico, it is the crossing of Spanish and Indian blood, it stands on the Chamizal, a national symbol because it’s land Mexico recovered from the United States,” he said. The two circles at the “waist” of the X represent the jaguar claws at the center of the Aztec Calendar Stone, another Mexican icon.

Chihuahua state sculptor Sebastian designed the monument and, prior to its inauguration, told Mexican media that the letter X has a special meaning for Juarez. That’s because the city’s namesake, former Mexican President Benito Juarez, officially changed “Mejico” to “Mexico” in 1857. The name stems from the native American Nahuatl language but the Spaniards who conquered Mexico always used a “J,” he said. “It’s about recovering our symbols, our identity. Now we include the ‘X’ whenever we do presentations or put out videos about the city of Juarez,” Acereto said.

He added that, at the urging of Sebastian, the mayor began setting aside funds and encouraging prominent individuals to contribute to the repairs.

Visit the BorderReport.com homepage for the latest exclusive stories and breaking news about issues along the United States-Mexico border.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/putting-the-x-back-in-mexico-gigantic-red-sculpture-getting-a-makeover-in-juarez-2/feed/ 0 25398
Trump wades into expensive House rematch in New Mexico https://prensa-fifi.com/trump-wades-into-expensive-house-rematch-in-new-mexico/ https://prensa-fifi.com/trump-wades-into-expensive-house-rematch-in-new-mexico/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:19 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/trump-wades-into-expensive-house-rematch-in-new-mexico/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.cbsnews.com


After returning from Walter Reed Medical Center following his COVID-19 diagnosis earlier this month, one of President Trump's first moves back in the White House was to rally supporters over the phone in New Mexico's Second Congressional District.

"I'm sitting in the Oval Office of the White House and there's nothing more important than getting you to Washington because we need you badly," the president said in a recording of the call posted by Yvette Herrell, the GOP candidate there.

"Yvette's opponent, Xochitl Torres Small, is a total puppet for Nancy Pelosi. She's a radical left puppet," the president added.

screen-shot-2020-10-20-at-11-03-18-am.png
File: (Left to right) New Mexico Rep. Xochitl Torres Small (D) / Yvette Herrell (R) AP file photos

In New Mexico, Hillary Clinton bested then-candidate Trump by more than 8 points in 2016. And despite a years-long investment by the Trump campaign in the state, Mr. Trump remains deeply unpopular: a recent survey found Joe Biden leading by a steep 14-point margin among New Mexicans.

But Republicans hope the president's backing could boost turnout in the slice of New Mexico that elected first-term Democratic Congresswoman Xochitl Torres Small in 2018. Torres Small's district counts among a select handful to have both backed President Trump by double-digit margins in 2016 and a Democratic House newcomer just two years later.

"I am popular in your district, to put it mildly — like record numbers. And she was saying all these wonderful things about me but then she raises her hand all the time — let's impeach him," Mr. Trump said of Torres Small on the call.

Recent polls put the rematch of their 2018 race within the margin of error. Herrell lost to Torres Small by less than two points.

Herrell is a local small business owner and realtor who represented southern New Mexico as a lawmaker in the New Mexico state House. Torres Small worked as a field representative in the state for U.S. Senator Tom Udall and was an attorney before her midterm election victory.

"I put politics aside and worked with Republicans, Democrats, and President Trump to pass the coronavirus relief plan," Torres Small said in her first spot of this cycle, among a slew of ads aggressively touting a moderate message.

Torres Small's voting record ranks as one of the most conservative among House Democrats, though critics often point to a ProPublica analysis showing she voted with Nancy Pelosi 94% of the time.

Other spots have featured footage of Torres Small looking to "unwind" over target practice, wielding a 12-gauge shotgun and praise from a "lifelong Republican" over aid she secured for a local rural hospital.

Herrell's campaign has fired back with ads of its own, including one featuring a local Democratic sheriff accusing Torres Small of having "sold us out and voted for gun control" over backing a background checks bill the Trump administration eventually opposed.

Outside groups have also poured millions into New Mexico's Second Congressional District, ballooning the race into one America's most expensive, according to a Wesleyan Media Project analysis of Kantar/CMAG television ad spending data.

The swelling cost of the contest has also become an issue in itself for allies on both sides, from attacks on Torres Small for accepting "more than $100,000 from lobbyists" to denunciations of Herrell for taking "over $200,000 from corporate polluters."

Torres Small ranks among the 20 top-raising House incumbents in Congress, her total fundraising haul tripling that of Herrell's.

Democrats have denounced Herrell for "turning a blind eye to ethics laws" after the Republican attributed a $2,800 donation received through WinRed, the GOP's main fundraising platform, to a donor who had died in 2017 before WinRed was even launched in 2019.

Herrell's campaign blamed the prohibited donation on a move made automatically by their fundraising system, claiming it fixed the error as soon as it was identified with an amended report to the FEC.

But few issues have dominated this toss-up race like oil and gas, which had fueled much of New Mexico's growth before the COVID-19 pandemic crippled the industry earlier this year.

"There's a bunch of companies who, they're closing up shop until next year because they have just absolutely no work," says Caleb Garcia, who works as a safety coordinator for a trucking company in the state's once-booming oil and gas economy.

After plummeting earlier this year when oil prices collapsed, oil production in New Mexico has gradually ticked up across the state. But a long road to recovery remains for the industry. Just 45 rigs were active in New Mexico, down from 112 rigs at this time last year, according to a tally by oilfield services firm Baker Hughes.

"We went down from 45 to 50 drivers down to maybe 25. And that's mainly so that everyone can get decent hours. We're not talking about how it used to be where it was 90 to 100 hours. These guys are 45 hours, barely," added Garcia.

Torres Small has repeatedly insisted she "stood up" to fellow Democrats in defending the state's breadwinner firms, citing her push to include the industry for coronavirus relief and praise from the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. After New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez appeared to celebrate the pandemic-induced crash in oil prices earlier this year, Torres Small rebuked the New York Democrat for taking "joy in their suffering."

But such moves have done little to avert her opponents' attacks over the issue.

Several spots run by the GOP-aligned Congressional Leadership Fund accuse Torres Small of "working together" with Ocasio-Cortez "to end oil and gas production" and decry spending by the League of Conservation Voters that backs Torres Small. In debates, Herrell has repeatedly criticized the Democrat for saying she would vote for Joe Biden, whose campaign has signaled he would oppose new fracking on federal lands as president.

"You know, in 2016 we had that crazy downturn and we went back to booming after that. No one expected that. This time around everyone's saying, 'I don't know if it will happen again. We're just hoping to have jobs after the election,'" said Garcia, a self-described moderate voter who has worked to support local Democrats in the past.

Oil and gas trade groups claim Biden's proposed ban on new fracking from federal lands could cost New Mexico 62,000 jobs by 2022. Torres Small has vowed to oppose the former vice president on this policy, saying she disagreed with his "oil and gas approach."

"I wish people who were of that Green New Deal understood this area of the country. You know, New Mexico, one third of our GDP comes from this industry. You close down the oil and gas industry, you're shutting down our economy," added Garcia.


After returning from Walter Reed Medical Center following his COVID-19 diagnosis earlier this month, one of President Trump’s first moves back in the White House was to rally supporters over the phone in New Mexico’s Second Congressional District.

«I’m sitting in the Oval Office of the White House and there’s nothing more important than getting you to Washington because we need you badly,» the president said in a recording of the call posted by Yvette Herrell, the GOP candidate there.

«Yvette’s opponent, Xochitl Torres Small, is a total puppet for Nancy Pelosi. She’s a radical left puppet,» the president added. File: (Left to right) New Mexico Rep. Xochitl Torres Small (D) / Yvette Herrell (R) AP file photos In New Mexico, Hillary Clinton bested then-candidate Trump by more than 8 points in 2016. And despite a years-long investment by the Trump campaign in the state, Mr. Trump remains deeply unpopular: a recent survey found Joe Biden leading by a steep 14-point margin among New Mexicans. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox

But Republicans hope the president’s backing could boost turnout in the slice of New Mexico that elected first-term Democratic Congresswoman Xochitl Torres Small in 2018. Torres Small’s district counts among a select handful to have both backed President Trump by double-digit margins in 2016 and a Democratic House newcomer just two years later.

«I am popular in your district, to put it mildly — like record numbers. And she was saying all these wonderful things about me but then she raises her hand all the time — let’s impeach him,» Mr. Trump said of Torres Small on the call.

Recent polls put the rematch of their 2018 race within the margin of error. Herrell lost to Torres Small by less than two points. Trump 2020

Trump wades into expensive House rematch in New Mexico

Debate Commission says it will mute mics at final debate

Exxon on hypothetical Trump call: «It never happened»

Trump calls Fauci a «disaster» but says it would be «a bigger bomb to fire him»

Battleground Tracker: Biden leads in Wisconsin, has edge in Arizona

More Herrell is a local small business owner and realtor who represented southern New Mexico as a lawmaker in the New Mexico state House. Torres Small worked as a field representative in the state for U.S. Senator Tom Udall and was an attorney before her midterm election victory.

«I put politics aside and worked with Republicans, Democrats, and President Trump to pass the coronavirus relief plan,» Torres Small said in her first spot of this cycle , among a slew of ads aggressively touting a moderate message.

Torres Small’s voting record ranks as one of the most conservative among House Democrats, though critics often point to a ProPublica analysis showing she voted with Nancy Pelosi 94% of the time.

Other spots have featured footage of Torres Small looking to «unwind» over target practice, wielding a 12-gauge shotgun and praise from a «lifelong Republican» over aid she secured for a local rural hospital .

Herrell’s campaign has fired back with ads of its own, including one featuring a local Democratic sheriff accusing Torres Small of having «sold us out and voted for gun control» over backing a background checks bill the Trump administration eventually opposed.

Outside groups have also poured millions into New Mexico’s Second Congressional District, ballooning the race into one America’s most expensive, according to a Wesleyan Media Project analysis of Kantar/CMAG television ad spending data.

The swelling cost of the contest has also become an issue in itself for allies on both sides, from attacks on Torres Small for accepting «more than $100,000 from lobbyists» to denunciations of Herrell for taking «over $200,000 from corporate polluters.»

Torres Small ranks among the 20 top-raising House incumbents in Congress, her total fundraising haul tripling that of Herrell’s.

Democrats have denounced Herrell for «turning a blind eye to ethics laws» after the Republican attributed a $2,800 donation received through WinRed, the GOP’s main fundraising platform, to a donor who had died in 2017 before WinRed was even launched in 2019.

Herrell’s campaign blamed the prohibited donation on a move made automatically by their fundraising system, claiming it fixed the error as soon as it was identified with an amended report to the FEC.

But few issues have dominated this toss-up race like oil and gas, which had fueled much of New Mexico’s growth before the COVID-19 pandemic crippled the industry earlier this year .

«There’s a bunch of companies who, they’re closing up shop until next year because they have just absolutely no work,» says Caleb Garcia, who works as a safety coordinator for a trucking company in the state’s once-booming oil and gas economy.

After plummeting earlier this year when oil prices collapsed, oil production in New Mexico has gradually ticked up across the state . But a long road to recovery remains for the industry. Just 45 rigs were active in New Mexico, down from 112 rigs at this time last year, according to a tally by oilfield services firm Baker Hughes.

«We went down from 45 to 50 drivers down to maybe 25. And that’s mainly so that everyone can get decent hours. We’re not talking about how it used to be where it was 90 to 100 hours. These guys are 45 hours, barely,» added Garcia.Torres Small has repeatedly insisted she «stood up» to fellow Democrats in defending the state’s breadwinner firms, citing her push to include the industry for coronavirus relief and praise from the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association. After New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez appeared to celebrate the pandemic-induced crash in oil prices earlier this year, Torres Small rebuked the New York Democrat for taking «joy in their suffering.»But such moves have done little to avert her opponents’ attacks over the issue.Several spots run by the GOP-aligned Congressional Leadership Fund accuse Torres Small of «working together» with Ocasio-Cortez «to end oil and gas production» and decry spending by the League of Conservation Voters that backs Torres Small . In debates, Herrell […]

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/trump-wades-into-expensive-house-rematch-in-new-mexico/feed/ 0 25399
New Mexico governor announces further restrictions on businesses to mitigate COVID-19 https://prensa-fifi.com/new-mexico-governor-announces-further-restrictions-on-businesses-to-mitigate-covid-19/ https://prensa-fifi.com/new-mexico-governor-announces-further-restrictions-on-businesses-to-mitigate-covid-19/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:16 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/new-mexico-governor-announces-further-restrictions-on-businesses-to-mitigate-covid-19/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at kfoxtv.com


NMCOVID2Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham gives her weekly update on COVID-19 in New Mexico and the state effort to control it. The news conference was held at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe, Thursday October 1, 2020. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)
NMCOVID2Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham gives her weekly update on COVID-19 in New Mexico and the state effort to control it. The news conference was held at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe, Thursday October 1, 2020. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

SANTA FE, NM (KFOX14) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and state officials held a remote news conference Tuesday to provide an update on the state’s efforts against COVID-19.

New Mexico released data for hospital capacity in the state showing 2,339 of 2,872 adult hospital beds are currently occupied and 432 of 605 intensive care unit beds are occupied.

Secretary for Health and Human Services Dr. David Scrase said last week’s average daily new cases total was 525 and New Mexico currently has one of the highest rates of spread in the U.S. at 1.27.

According to Dr. Scrase, New Mexico’s 7-day test positivity rate is currently 6.5%, a 91% increase since Oct. 1.

Gov. Lujan Grisham announced some changes coming to target hot spots and mitigate spread of COVID-19 in New Mexico.

Beginning Friday, Oct. 23, businesses in New Mexico that record four rapid responses in a 14-day period will be required to close for two full weeks. This order applies to food and drink establishments, retail establishments, places of lodging and close-contact businesses defined in the state’s public health order.

Additional safety measures are also being put in place for food and drink establishments to be able to offer indoor dining at a maximum capacity of 25%.

These measures include:

  • Requiring establishments to complete the New Mexico Safe Certification training program.
  • Requiring establishments to consent to spot COVID-19 testing of employees.
  • Requiring establishments to keep a logbook of all customers who dine-in for 3 weeks to support contact tracing.

Food and drink establishments have until Oct. 30 to become certified or they will not be able to operate indoor dining.

New Mexico’s contact tracers said food and drink establishments remain a top source of possible COVID-19 exposure.

Lujan Grisham also announced that retail spaces will be required to close by 10 p.m. every night and encouraged New Mexicans to shop alone or consider online shopping and curbside pickup.

“If the virus continues to spread exponentially, we will have to go farther and issue harsher restrictions,” Lujan Grisham said. “This is a last resort. We need your help to make this work.”

On Monday, New Mexico’s total COVID-19 cases rose to 37,302, 20,001 of which have since recovered, and 935 people in the state have died from the disease, according to the New Mexico Department of Health.

The NMDOH also reported a high number of COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state Monday, with 183 people across New Mexico hospitalized for the disease.

______________________________________

Stay up to date with what's happening in our area by signing up for our newsletter.


NMCOVID2Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham gives her weekly update on COVID-19 in New Mexico and the state effort to control it. The news conference was held at the Roundhouse in Santa Fe, Thursday October 1, 2020. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal) SANTA FE, NM (KFOX14) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and state officials held a remote news conference Tuesday to provide an update on the state’s efforts against COVID-19. New Mexico released data for hospital capacity in the state showing 2,339 of 2,872 adult hospital beds are currently occupied and 432 of 605 intensive care unit beds are occupied.

Secretary for Health and Human Services Dr. David Scrase said last week’s average daily new cases total was 525 and New Mexico currently has one of the highest rates of spread in the U.S. at 1.27.

According to Dr. Scrase, New Mexico’s 7-day test positivity rate is currently 6.5%, a 91% increase since Oct. 1.

Gov. Lujan Grisham announced some changes coming to target hot spots and mitigate spread of COVID-19 in New Mexico.

Beginning Friday, Oct. 23, businesses in New Mexico that record four rapid responses in a 14-day period will be required to close for two full weeks. This order applies to food and drink establishments, retail establishments, places of lodging and close-contact businesses defined in the state’s public health order.

Additional safety measures are also being put in place for food and drink establishments to be able to offer indoor dining at a maximum capacity of 25%.

These measures include: Requiring establishments to complete the New Mexico Safe Certification training program.

Requiring establishments to consent to spot COVID-19 testing of employees.

Requiring establishments to keep a logbook of all customers who dine-in for 3 weeks to support contact tracing.

Food and drink establishments have until Oct. 30 to become certified or they will not be able to operate indoor dining.

New Mexico’s contact tracers said food and drink establishments remain a top source of possible COVID-19 exposure.

Lujan Grisham also announced that retail spaces will be required to close by 10 p.m. every night and encouraged New Mexicans to shop alone or consider online shopping and curbside pickup.

“If the virus continues to spread exponentially, we will have to go farther and issue harsher restrictions,” Lujan Grisham said. “This is a last resort. We need your help to make this work.”

On Monday, New Mexico’s total COVID-19 cases rose to 37,302 , 20,001 of which have since recovered, and 935 people in the state have died from the disease, according to the New Mexico Department of Health.

The NMDOH also reported a high number of COVID-19-related hospitalizations in the state Monday, with 183 people across New Mexico hospitalized for the disease.

______________________________________

Stay up to date with what’s happening in our area by signing up for our newsletter.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/new-mexico-governor-announces-further-restrictions-on-businesses-to-mitigate-covid-19/feed/ 0 25400
Motherson Sumi acquires assets of Bombardier’s wiring systems in Mexico for $10 mn https://prensa-fifi.com/motherson-sumi-acquires-assets-of-bombardiers-wiring-systems-in-mexico-for-10-mn/ https://prensa-fifi.com/motherson-sumi-acquires-assets-of-bombardiers-wiring-systems-in-mexico-for-10-mn/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:14 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/motherson-sumi-acquires-assets-of-bombardiers-wiring-systems-in-mexico-for-10-mn/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.moneycontrol.com


Vivek Chaand Sehgal, Chairman, Motherson Sumi Systems
Vivek Chaand Sehgal, Chairman, Motherson Sumi Systems

Motherson Sumi Systems (MSSL), via its Mexican subsidiary, has signed an agreement to acquire the activities of electrical wiring interconnection systems (EWIS) performed at Bombardier Transportation’s manufacturing site in Huehuetoca, Mexico.

The transaction includes the transfer of assets, employees, and inventories, on a debt-free and cash-free basis and is valued at around $10 million (subject to customary adjustments). The site manufactures harnesses and electrical assembly based on standard solutions.

The acquisition is done through Motherson Rolling Stocks S. de R.L. de C.V. (MRS), the Mexican subsidiary of MSSL. MRS is part of the Motherson Rolling Stock Division which designs and manufactures electrical cabinets, power packs, and electrical distribution systems for leading rolling stock manufacturers.

MSSL, through PKC Group (acquired in March 2017), is engaged in the manufacturing of wiring harnesses for rolling stock, mainly in Europe and the Americas region.

In 2019, the company through its subsidiary Motherson Rolling Stock Systems GB Limited, UK (MRSS) acquired Bombardier’s UK rolling stock electrical component and systems business in Derby.

Now, with the execution of this definitive agreement between MRS and Bombardier, the relationship will expand to Mexico.

The revenue of the said business was $25 million for calendar year 2019. The transaction is expected to be completed in Q4 FY21.

“We are further strengthening the relationship with Bombardier under the global partnership agreement and our collective strength will position us as a preferred solutions provider to our customers in the rolling stock business,” Vivek Chaand Sehgal, Chairman, MSSL, said in a statement.


Vivek Chaand Sehgal, Chairman, Motherson Sumi Systems Motherson Sumi Systems (MSSL), via its Mexican subsidiary, has signed an agreement to acquire the activities of electrical wiring interconnection systems (EWIS) performed at Bombardier Transportation’s manufacturing site in Huehuetoca, Mexico.

The transaction includes the transfer of assets, employees, and inventories, on a debt-free and cash-free basis and is valued at around $10 million (subject to customary adjustments). The site manufactures harnesses and electrical assembly based on standard solutions.

The acquisition is done through Motherson Rolling Stocks S. de R.L. de C.V. (MRS), the Mexican subsidiary of MSSL. MRS is part of the Motherson Rolling Stock Division which designs and manufactures electrical cabinets, power packs, and electrical distribution systems for leading rolling stock manufacturers.

MSSL, through PKC Group (acquired in March 2017), is engaged in the manufacturing of wiring harnesses for rolling stock, mainly in Europe and the Americas region.

In 2019, the company through its subsidiary Motherson Rolling Stock Systems GB Limited, UK (MRSS) acquired Bombardier’s UK rolling stock electrical component and systems business in Derby.

Now, with the execution of this definitive agreement between MRS and Bombardier, the relationship will expand to Mexico.

The revenue of the said business was $25 million for calendar year 2019. The transaction is expected to be completed in Q4 FY21.

“We are further strengthening the relationship with Bombardier under the global partnership agreement and our collective strength will position us as a preferred solutions provider to our customers in the rolling stock business,” Vivek Chaand Sehgal, Chairman, MSSL, said in a statement.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/motherson-sumi-acquires-assets-of-bombardiers-wiring-systems-in-mexico-for-10-mn/feed/ 0 25401
Colorado State football game vs. New Mexico canceled due to COVID-19 issues https://prensa-fifi.com/colorado-state-football-game-vs-new-mexico-canceled-due-to-covid-19-issues/ https://prensa-fifi.com/colorado-state-football-game-vs-new-mexico-canceled-due-to-covid-19-issues/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:12 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/colorado-state-football-game-vs-new-mexico-canceled-due-to-covid-19-issues/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.usatoday.com


FORT COLLINS, Colo. -- The eight-game football season is now down to seven.

The Mountain West has called off the Colorado State football team's season opener for due to coronavirus concerns in New Mexico. The Rams were scheduled to host New Mexico Saturday night.

"Due to the prevalence of the COVID-19 virus in Bernalillo County and in accordance with state guidelines, the University of New Mexico is unable to participate in the scheduled football game on Saturday, Oct. 24, at Colorado State University," read a release from the Mountain West.

"Therefore, the Mountain West is canceling the game and declaring it a no contest. There is no plan to reschedule the game."

This is the 30th FBS game canceled or postponed for COVID-19 issues since the season began according to a list compiled by USA TODAY.

The Mountain West schedule is set to begin Saturday, the first of eight consecutive weeks for an eight-game schedule. That leaves no room for makeups.

New Mexico hasn’t been able to hold full-team practices since the middle of last week because of COVID-19 cases and concerns. Eight players and one assistant coach tested positive last week.

Because of high case counts in Bernalillo County, where the school's main campus in Albuquerque is located, a variance to state and county public-health orders allowing the Lobos and other college sports teams to practice has been rescinded.

The statewide order without a variance limits group gatherings to five people. New Mexico has been practicing the past few days in small groups to comply with the restriction, athletic department spokesman Frank Mercogliano said Monday.

CSU has had troubles of its own in prep for the originally scheduled season opener.

“We’re down 20s of players per practice,” Addazio said in a virtual news conference Monday. “It’s kind of been that way for the last 10 days."

The Rams twice had to cancel scheduled scrimmages during training camp, once due to not enough players available and once due to unhealthy air caused by wildfire smoke.

In Monday's press conference, Addazio mentioned the uncertainty and reality of knowing any game could be called off.

"Today's Monday. I don't know what tomorrow brings. I don't know what Thursday brings. You just don't know," Addazio said.


FORT COLLINS, Colo. — The eight-game football season is now down to seven.

The Mountain West has called off the Colorado State football team’s season opener for due to coronavirus concerns in New Mexico. The Rams were scheduled to host New Mexico Saturday night.

«Due to the prevalence of the COVID-19 virus in Bernalillo County and in accordance with state guidelines, the University of New Mexico is unable to participate in the scheduled football game on Saturday, Oct. 24, at Colorado State University,» read a release from the Mountain West.

«Therefore, the Mountain West is canceling the game and declaring it a no contest. There is no plan to reschedule the game.»

This is the 30th FBS game canceled or postponed for COVID-19 issues since the season began according to a list compiled by USA TODAY .

The Mountain West schedule is set to begin Saturday, the first of eight consecutive weeks for an eight-game schedule. That leaves no room for makeups.

New Mexico hasn’t been able to hold full-team practices since the middle of last week because of COVID-19 cases and concerns . Eight players and one assistant coach tested positive last week.

Because of high case counts in Bernalillo County, where the school’s main campus in Albuquerque is located, a variance to state and county public-health orders allowing the Lobos and other college sports teams to practice has been rescinded.

The statewide order without a variance limits group gatherings to five people. New Mexico has been practicing the past few days in small groups to comply with the restriction, athletic department spokesman Frank Mercogliano said Monday.

CSU has had troubles of its own in prep for the originally scheduled season opener .

“We’re down 20s of players per practice,” Addazio said in a virtual news conference Monday. “It’s kind of been that way for the last 10 days.»

The Rams twice had to cancel scheduled scrimmages during training camp, once due to not enough players available and once due to unhealthy air caused by wildfire smoke.

In Monday’s press conference, Addazio mentioned the uncertainty and reality of knowing any game could be called off.

«Today’s Monday. I don’t know what tomorrow brings. I don’t know what Thursday brings. You just don’t know,» Addazio said.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/colorado-state-football-game-vs-new-mexico-canceled-due-to-covid-19-issues/feed/ 0 25404
Avocados From Mexico ends 6-year Super Bowl ad streak, signaling bigger changes for the big game https://prensa-fifi.com/avocados-from-mexico-ends-6-year-super-bowl-ad-streak-signaling-bigger-changes-for-the-big-game/ https://prensa-fifi.com/avocados-from-mexico-ends-6-year-super-bowl-ad-streak-signaling-bigger-changes-for-the-big-game/#respond Wed, 21 Oct 2020 04:30:10 +0000 https://prensa-fifi.com/target/avocados-from-mexico-ends-6-year-super-bowl-ad-streak-signaling-bigger-changes-for-the-big-game/ Read More...]]> Click here to view original web page at www.marketingdive.com


Avocados from Mexico

Avocados From Mexico, an independent produce brand established in 2013, has since its founding become a Super Bowl regular, building itself into a household name through quirky, star-studded ads around the big game. The company's six-year Super Bowl streak will come to an end in 2021, however, as it shifts focus to areas like mass personalization, chief executive Alvaro Luque told industry trade The Packer in a video interview that was covered by Ad Age this week.

Luque told The Packer that Avocados From Mexico will leverage the down period to reinvent itself, with plans to return to the Super Bowl in 2022. Hovering around its decision is the coronavirus pandemic, which has created serious disruptions to the current NFL season and previously jettisoned major live TV events like the Summer Olympics.

But sports marketers were cautious to uphold Avocados From Mexico's dropping out as a precursor to some larger advertiser exodus from Super Bowl LV. Rather, they said the news sends an early signal that the makeup of brands advertising around the big game — and how they execute their media strategies — could be seriously altered as the health crisis persists through the winter months and continues to affect consumer habits.

"I don't see them pulling out of the Super Bowl as a reflection on interest in this year's game," Larry Mann, executive vice president of sports marketing agency rEvolution, said over email. "When you're [a] brand that's often so focused on large events, parties and gatherings of friends, families, etc., it's especially critical to rethink your brand positioning, platforms, tactics, etc., to reflect the current environment."

Changing timeline

In some ways, the current setup heading into Super Bowl LV is business as usual. CBS, the network airing the game, is asking for around $5.5 million per 30-second TV spot, according to media reports, which falls roughly in line with the rates of recent years.

That high-dollar figure shows continued confidence not only that the Super Bowl will happen in February, but also that marketers are still willing to shell out top dollar in a sports media space that has seen viewership slip and experienced significant scheduling disruptions this year. Avocados from Mexico is the first marketer to affirm it will not have a Super Bowl ad buy in 2021, per Ad Age, while Mars Wrigley — another big game regular — announced plans for a campaign in August, without specifying which of its brands would run ads.

"My gut is that while certain brands may decide to sit out the Super Bowl [due] to a variety of potential factors, I don't think CBS will be lacking advertisers who are willing to get in the game this year," Mann said.

The upshot could be that, while there won't be a significant drop in the volume of Super Bowl advertisers, brands affirming their commitments will happen on the type of jumpy, fast-moving timeline that's become typical to media negotiations around the pandemic. Consumers and the ad industry both pay close attention to which brands plan Super Bowl spots, but the chances that CBS will have sold out its inventory by Thanksgiving — a milestone other networks have achieved in recent years — is less likely this year, according to Joe Zajac, senior vice president of brand marketing Excel Sports Management.

"Our current sense is that marketplace factors will have a bigger impact on timing of commitments than on ultimate participation," Zajac said over email.

Areas like streaming could also get a bigger spotlight, per Mann, as CBS is reportedly requiring advertisers to have their commercials appear on its livestream of Super Bowl LV.

Get marketing news like this in your inbox daily. Subscribe to Marketing Dive:

As marketers like Avocados from Mexico step back as key selling occasions like large watch parties are on hold, it's also possible that new categories will move in. Delivery platforms, for example, have become a staple of pandemic buying habits, and subsequently bigger players in sports marketing. Postmates last month became the official on-demand food delivery partner of the NFL.

"From a brand perception and market share perspective, there will be winners and losers coming out of all this upheaval, and the Super Bowl is an enormous opportunity to disrupt traditional category dynamics," Zajac said.


Avocados from Mexico Avocados From Mexico, an independent produce brand established in 2013, has since its founding become a Super Bowl regular , building itself into a household name through quirky, star-studded ads around the big game. The company’s six-year Super Bowl streak will come to an end in 2021, however, as it shifts focus to areas like mass personalization, chief executive Alvaro Luque told industry trade The Packer in a video interview that was covered by Ad Age this week.

Luque told The Packer that Avocados From Mexico will leverage the down period to reinvent itself, with plans to return to the Super Bowl in 2022. Hovering around its decision is the coronavirus pandemic, which has created serious disruptions to the current NFL season and previously jettisoned major live TV events like the Summer Olympics.

But sports marketers were cautious to uphold Avocados From Mexico’s dropping out as a precursor to some larger advertiser exodus from Super Bowl LV. Rather, they said the news sends an early signal that the makeup of brands advertising around the big game — and how they execute their media strategies — could be seriously altered as the health crisis persists through the winter months and continues to affect consumer habits.

«I don’t see them pulling out of the Super Bowl as a reflection on interest in this year’s game,» Larry Mann, executive vice president of sports marketing agency rEvolution, said over email. «When you’re [a] brand that’s often so focused on large events, parties and gatherings of friends, families, etc., it’s especially critical to rethink your brand positioning, platforms, tactics, etc., to reflect the current environment.» Changing timeline

In some ways, the current setup heading into Super Bowl LV is business as usual. CBS, the network airing the game, is asking for around $5.5 million per 30-second TV spot , according to media reports , which falls roughly in line with the rates of recent years.

That high-dollar figure shows continued confidence not only that the Super Bowl will happen in February, but also that marketers are still willing to shell out top dollar in a sports media space that has seen viewership slip and experienced significant scheduling disruptions this year. Avocados from Mexico is the first marketer to affirm it will not have a Super Bowl ad buy in 2021, per Ad Age, while Mars Wrigley — another big game regular — announced plans for a campaign in August , without specifying which of its brands would run ads.

«My gut is that while certain brands may decide to sit out the Super Bowl [due] to a variety of potential factors, I don’t think CBS will be lacking advertisers who are willing to get in the game this year,» Mann said.

The upshot could be that, while there won’t be a significant drop in the volume of Super Bowl advertisers, brands affirming their commitments will happen on the type of jumpy, fast-moving timeline that’s become typical to media negotiations around the pandemic. Consumers and the ad industry both pay close attention to which brands plan Super Bowl spots, but the chances that CBS will have sold out its inventory by Thanksgiving — a milestone other networks have achieved in recent years — is less likely this year, according to Joe Zajac, senior vice president of brand marketing Excel Sports Management.

«Our current sense is that marketplace factors will have a bigger impact on timing of commitments than on ultimate participation,» Zajac said over email.

Areas like streaming could also get a bigger spotlight, per Mann, as CBS is reportedly requiring advertisers to have their commercials appear on its livestream of Super Bowl LV.

Get marketing news like this in your inbox daily. Subscribe to Marketing Dive:

As marketers like Avocados from Mexico step back as key selling occasions like large watch parties are on hold, it’s also possible that new categories will move in. Delivery platforms, for example, have become a staple of pandemic buying habits, and subsequently bigger players in sports marketing. Postmates last month became the official on-demand food delivery partner of the NFL.

«From a brand perception and market share perspective, there will be winners and losers coming out of all this upheaval, and the Super Bowl is an enormous opportunity to disrupt traditional category dynamics,» Zajac said.

]]>
https://prensa-fifi.com/avocados-from-mexico-ends-6-year-super-bowl-ad-streak-signaling-bigger-changes-for-the-big-game/feed/ 0 25403