Noticias

Youth departs Mexico’s emigrants in America are ageing

Click here to view original web page at www.economist.com


TWO KINDS OF EMPTY homes bespeckle the hills and valleys of central Mexico and they could not be more different. The first are the crumbling grey cinder-block houses of people who left long ago and never returned. Then there are the dazzling two-storey mansions built with the dollars of migrants working in the United States, which briefly fill with light and laughter each year when their owners come to visit.

Now another migrant-funded flourish is appearing in the Mexican countryside. Over the past five years in Los Haro, a farming village in the state of Zacatecas, “ridiculous” towering graves have sprouted up in the local cemetery, says Norma Nava, a farmer. The migrants who left half a century ago are starting to die. Just like their fancy houses, their mausoleum-style tombs cast shadows over the humble resting places of neighbours who never left.


TWO KINDS OF EMPTY homes bespeckle the hills and valleys of central Mexico and they could not be more different. The first are the crumbling grey cinder-block houses of people who left long ago and never returned. Then there are the dazzling two-storey mansions built with the dollars of migrants working in the United States, which briefly fill with light and laughter each year when their owners come to visit.

Now another migrant-funded flourish is appearing in the Mexican countryside. Over the past five years in Los Haro, a farming village in the state of Zacatecas, “ridiculous” towering graves have sprouted up in the local cemetery, says Norma Nava, a farmer. The migrants who left half a century ago are starting to die. Just like their fancy houses, their mausoleum-style tombs cast shadows over the humble resting places of neighbours who never left.